Stylish Copper Bathroom Wall-mount Thermostatic Faucet

Stylish Copper Bathroom Wall-mount Thermostatic Faucet

5 (8 product reviews)Added 4 years ago
US$ 75.39 Free worldwide shipping!
DinoDirect
Everyone wants to make the kitchen look fantastic and modern, but how? Let's start from the basin! Thermostatic Faucet without doubt, contributes a lot to such a beautifying project. Here, we bring you this single handle faucet to you. Thermostatic faucet is controlled by built-in automatic adjustable temperature valve, so the Bathroom Faucet can balance the water pressure of cold and hot water in short time to maintain the stability of water temperature. This thermostatic faucet offers convenience, quality and style to your life. It is fashionable enough to make your house look modern. The service life of ceramic valve can attain many times which allows our faucets to be used for a long time.Moreover, this Copper Faucet fits the room perfectly. When you turn on the faucet, the water comes out like a waterfall, shining with colorful LED light. Pretty fantastic! ## Product Description Specification Buying Guide Return Policies Specifications: Replace the traditional faucet with this thermostatic faucet in your home and enjoy the shower because of the invariably temperature water TheBathroom Faucet addsmodern look in your bathroom The thermostatic faucetis easy for you to install the faucet correctly even if you never install faucets before The service life of valve of the thermostaticfaucet can attain to many times which allows ourthermostaticmixer to be used for a long time Each of our faucets Copper Faucet has been performed with high water pressure test before delivery to ensure the absolute quality Thermostaticfaucet is controlled by built-in automatic adjustable temperature valve, so it can balance the water pressure of cold and hot water in short time to maintain the stability of water temperature All of our faucets have been proved to be no-leak during lifetime due to the durable ceramic valves Each of our faucets has been performed with high water pressure test before delivery to ensure the absolute quality Installation Type: Wall Mounted Valve Type: Ceramic Material: Copper Color: Silver Details: The service life of valve of the thermostaticfaucet can attain to many times which allows ourthermostaticmixer to be used for a long time Each of our faucets thermostaticfaucet has been performed with high water pressure test before delivery to ensure the absolute quality Thermostaticfaucet is controlled by built-in automatic adjustable temperature valve, so it can balance the water pressure of cold and hot water in short time to maintain the stability of water temperature What is a Water Tap? A tap is a valve controlling release of liquids (also called faucet and spigot in the U.S.) or gas. In the British Isles and most of the Commonwealth, the word is used for any everyday type of valve, particularly the fittings that control water supply to bathtubs and sinks. In the U.S., the term "tap" is more often used for beer taps, cut-in connections, or wiretapping. "Faucet" or "spigot" are used to refer to water valves The physical characteristic which differentiates a spigot from other valves is the lack of any type of a mechanical thread or fastener on the outlet. Water for baths, sinks and basins can be provided by separate hot and cold taps; this arrangement is common in older installations, particularly in public washrooms/lavatories and utility rooms/laundries. In kitchens and bathrooms mixer taps are commonly used. In this case, hot and cold water from the two valves is mixed together before reaching the outlet, allowing the water to emerge at any temperature between that of the hot and cold water supplies. Mixer taps were invented by Thomas Campbell of Saint John, New Brunswick and patented in 1880 For baths and showers, mixer taps frequently incorporate some sort of pressure balancing feature so that the hot/cold mixture ratio will not be affected by transient changes in the pressure of one or the other of the supplies. This helps avoid scalding or uncomfortable chilling as other water loads occur (such as the flushing of a toilet). Rather than two separate valves, mixer taps frequently use a single, more complex, valve controlled by a single handle (single handle mixer). The handle moves up and down to control the amount of water flow and from side to side to control the temperature of the water. Especially for baths and showers, the latest designs do this using a built in thermostat. These are known as thermostatic mixing valves, or TMVs, and can be mechanical or electronic. There are also faucets with color LED's to show the temperature of the water If separate taps are fitted, it may not be immediately clear which tap is hot and which is cold. The hot tap generally has a red indicator while the cold tap generally has a blue or green indicator. In English-speaking countries, the taps are frequently also labeled with an "H" or "C". Note that in countries with Romance languages, sometimes the letters "C" for hot and "F" for cold are used, possibly creating confusion when English speakers visit these countries or vice versa. Mixer taps may have a red-blue stripe or arrows indicating which side will give hot and which cold In most countries, there is a 'standard' arrangement of hot/cold taps: for example in the United States and Canada, the hot tap is on the left by building code requirements. This convention applies in the UK too, but many installations exist where it has been ignored. Mis-assembly of some single-valve mixer taps will exchange hot and cold even if the fixture has been plumbed correctly Most handles on residential homes are connected to the valve shaft and fastened down with a screw. Although on most commercial and industrial applications they are fitted with a removable key called a "loose key" or "Water key" which has a square peg and a square ended key to turn off and on the water. You can also take off the "Loose key" to prevent vandals from turning on the water. In older building before the "Loose key" was invented for some landlords or caretakers to take off the handle of a residential tap, which had teeth that would meet up with the gears on the valve shaft. This Teeth and cog system is still used on most modern faucets. Although most of the time a "Loose key" is on industrial and commercial applications sometimes you may see a "Loose key" on homes by the seashore to prevent passers-by from washing the sand off their feet Tap Mechanisms: The first screw-down tap mechanism was patented and manufactured by the Rotherham brass founders, Guest and Chrimes,in 1845. Most older taps use a soft rubber or neoprene washer which is screwed down onto a valve seat in order to stop the flow. This is called a "globe valve" in engineering and, while it gives a leak-proof seal and good fine adjustment of flow, both the rubber washer and the valve seat are subject to wear (and for the seat, also corrosion) over time, so that eventually no tight seal is formed in the closed position, resulting in a leaking tap. The washer can be replaced and the valve seat resurfaced (at least a few times), but globe valves are never maintenance-free Also, the tortuous S-shaped path the water is forced to follow offers a significant obstruction to the flow. For high pressure domestic water systems this does not matter, but for low pressure systems where flow rate is important, such as a shower fed by a storage tank, a "stop tap" or, in engineering terms, a "gate valve" is preferred Gate valves use a metal disc the same diameter as the pipe which is screwed into place perpendicularly to the flow, cutting it off. There is no resistance to flow when the tap is fully open, but this type of tap rarely gives a perfect seal when closed. In the UK this type of tap normally has a wheel-shaped handle rather than a crutch or capstan handle Cone valves or ball valves are another alternative. These are commonly-found as the service shut-off valves in more-expensive water systems and usually found in gas taps (and, incidentally, the cask beer taps referred to above). They can be identified by their range of motion-only 90°-between fully on and fully off. Usually, when the handle is in line with the pipe the valve is on, and when the handle is across the pipe it is closed. A cone valve consists of a shallowly-tapering cone in a tight-fitting socket placed across the flow of the fluid. In UK English this is usually known as a taper-plug cock. A ball valve uses a spherical ball instead. In either case, a hole through the cone or ball allows the fluid to pass if it is lined up with the openings in the socket through which the fluid enters and leaves; turning the cone using the handle rotates the passage away, presenting the fluid with the unbroken surface of the cone through which it cannot pass. Valves of this type using a cylinder rather than a cone are sometimes encountered, but using a cone allows a tight fit to be made even with moderate manufacturing tolerances. The ball in ball valves rotates within plastic seats Hands free infrared proximity sensors are replacing the standard valve. Thermostatically controlled electronic dual-purpose mixing or diverting valves are used within industrial applications to automatically provide liquids as required Foot controlled valves are installed within laboratory and healthcare/hospitals Modern taps often have aerators at the tip to help save water and reduce splashes. Without an aerator, water usually flows out of the tap in one big stream. An aerator spreads the water flow into many small droplets Modern bathroom and kitchen taps often use ceramic or plastic surfaces sliding against other spring-loaded ceramic surfaces or plastic washers. These tend to require far less maintenance than traditional globe valves and when maintenance is required, the entire interior of the valve is usually replaced, often as a single pre-assembled cartridge Of the trio of well-respected faucet manufacturers in North American plumbing circles, Moen and American Standard use cartridges (Moen's being O-ring based, American Standard's being ceramic), while Delta uses easily-replaced rubber seats facing the cartridge(s). Each design has its advantages: Moen cartridges tend to be easiest to find, American Standard cartridges have nearly infinite lifespan in sediment-free municipal water, and Delta's rubber seats tend to be most forgiving of sediment in well water General Faucet Installation Instruction: Step 1: Position the Faucet Step 2: Attach the Water Supply Tubes Step 3: Connect the Faucet Lift Rod Step 4: Flush the Faucet Tools You Need for Installation: Adjustable wrench Tape Screwdriver Flashlight Cleaning Methods: Cleaning Surface: Use cleaning agents to clean the dirt regularly. The water faucet should be rinsed with clean water and wipe it with a soft cotton cloth to keep surface clean before scrub the faucet. Do not wipe the faucet with abrasive cleaners, hard cloth, paper towels, wire ball and acidic or coarse material Cleaning Filter: Remove the air bubble and remove the filter. Then scrub the filter with a toothbrush or small brush under the tap How to Clean a Faucet Head? Cleaning a Shower Faucet Head: Place masking tape around the end of the shower arm that meets the wall and place another strip just above the shower head. This will prevent the wrench from scratching the shower arm Use a pipe wrench to hold the shower arm in place where it meets the wall. Unscrew the shower head with a second wrench Twist the shower head with your hand the rest of the way after loosening it up with the wrench. Remove the shower head from the shower arm Disassemble the shower head. The aerator is the hole-filled piece where the water comes out. Remove the aerator from the shower head by twisting or gently prying it off Fill a bowl with white vinegar, enough to submerge the shower head and all of its pieces. Allow the shower head to soak for at least 15 minutes, longer if needed Brush off all mineral deposits and gunk with a toothbrush. Poke the holes of the shower head with a toothpick to get rid of the gunk inside the holes. Place the pieces back together and twist back onto your shower arm Cleaning the Aerator on a Sink Faucet Head: Remove the aerator by unscrewing it from beneath the faucet head. The aerator, round with a screen on it, mixes water and air to give the water an even flow Place the aerator in a cup. Add enough white vinegar to submerge the aerator. Let it set for 15 minutes Use an old toothbrush to scrub the aerator to remove mineral deposits and other gunk that may be present Use a toothpick or safety pin to remove gunk from the screen and vents. The aerator is full of small holes and vents on both sides, and these holes get plugged with mineral deposits. The vinegar should remove most of the deposits, but some scrubbing may be necessary Rinse the aerator and screw it back on to the faucet How to Fix a Leaky Faucet? Step 1 Turn off the water supply to the leaky faucet. Water shutoffs are often located under the sink but in older homes there may only be one main water shut off for the entire house, usually located where the water pipe enters (often facing the street) Step 2 Open the faucet and let any water in the pipes drain out Step 3 Put in the sink drain plug or put a towel in the sink bottom. Faucets have small screws and you don't want to lose one down the drain Step 4 Remove the faucet handle. Virtually all handles are attached with a screw often hidden under a decorative cap that can be pried off with a small screwdriver Step 5 Remove the workings of the faucet and determine what kind of repair is required (see Tips). Once you have identified what kind of faucet you have, see the related eHow for details on repairing your particular faucet NOTE: Please clean the residual dirty water, debris, sands and impurities before the installation to avoid foaming, obstruction and valve damage Faucet with hot and cold water supply must be connected correctly Choose the appropriate wrench, avoid excessive force, forced installation and damaged parts Be careful wheninstall, do not break the line of battery box Package Included: * 1 x Thermostatic Faucet