55mm High Definition Ultraviolet UV Filter

55mm High Definition Ultraviolet UV Filter

5 (8 product reviews)Added 6 years ago
US$ 3.99 Free worldwide shipping!
DinoDirect
This 55mm UV lens filter is most often outdoors, especially at high altitudes, where the UV-absorbing atmosphere is thinner and over long distances, such as marine scenes. Ultraviolet lens filter absorbs UV light generally without affecting light in the visible region. It is important to distinguish between UV-generated haze and that of air-borne particles such as smog. The latter is made up of opaque matter that absorbs visible light as well as UV and will not be appreciably removed by a UV filter. 55mm HD lens filter can be used in combination with polarizer for stunning scenics or to protect the front lens element from dirt, fingerprints, and scratchesSo don't think twice, get this High Definition Ultraviolet 55mm UV lens filter for your favourite camera! : Spec Price: US $4.99 Under Feature Keywords: UV Protection Filter Diameter: 55mm Specifications: 55mm UV lens filter will help you make the most of virtually every photo opportunity by improving image impact and quality 55mm UV lens filter is meticulously crafted from the highest quality optical glass Ultraviolet UV improves contrast and color saturation by reducing the effects of ultraviolet light and atmospheric dust and haze in sunny landscapes, including mountain, marine and aerial scenes 55mm UV lens filter can be used in combination with polarizer for stunning scenics or to protect the front lens element from dirt, fingerprints, and scratches Size: 55mm/2.2in(Dia.) Details: This Ultraviolet lens filter eliminates problems from most situations where increased haze tends to wash out color and image clarity Lens Filter has a sharp central image with a pleasant blurring of the outer field Add an artistic touch to your photographs with this 55mm HD lens filter What's the Camera Lens Filters: Camera lens filters still have many uses in digital photography, and should be an important part of any photographer's camera bag. These can include polarizing filters to reduce glare and improve saturation, or simple UV/haze filters to provide extra protection for the front of your lens Lens Filter Type: The most commonly used filters for digital photography include polarizing (linear/circular), UV/haze, neutral density, graduated neutral density and warming/cooling or color filters Example uses for each are listed below: : Filter Type Primary Use Common Subject Matter Linear : & Circular Polarizers Reduce Glare Improve Saturation Sky / Water / Foliage in Landscape Photography Neutral Density (ND): Extend Exposure Time Waterfalls, Rivers under bright light Graduated Neutral Density (GND): Control Strong Light Gradients Reduce Vignetting Dramatically Lit Landscapes UV / Haze: Improve Clarity with Film Provide Lens Protection Any Warming / Cooling: Change White Balance Landscapes, Underwater, Special Lighting Problems with Lens Filters: Filters should only be used when necessary because they can also adversely affect the image. Since they effectively introduce an additional piece of glass between your camera's sensor and the subject, they have the potential to reduce image quality. This usually comes in the form of either a slight color tint, a reduction in local or overall image contrast, or ghosting and increased lens flare caused by light inadvertently reflecting off the inside of the filter Filters may also introduce physical vignetting (light fall-off or blackening at the edges of the image) if their opaque edge gets in the way of light entering the lens (right example). This was created by stacking a polarizing filter on top of a UV filter while also using a wide angle lens-causing the edges of the outermost filter to get in the way of the image. Stacking filters therefore has the potential to make all of the above problems much worse Note on Choosing a Filter Size for a Camera Lens: Lens filters generally come in two varieties: screw-on and front filters. Front filters are more flexible because they can be used on virtually any lens diameter, however these may also be more cumbersome to use since they may need to be held in front of the lens. On the other hand, filter holder kits are available that can improve this process. Screw-on filters can provide an air-tight seal when needed for protection, and cannot accidentally move relative to the lens during composure. The main disadvantage is that a given screw-on filter will only work with a specific lens size The size of a screw-on filter is expressed in terms of its diameter, which corresponds to the diameter usually listed on the top or front of your camera lens. This diameter is listed in millimeters and usually ranges from about 46 to 82 mm for digital SLR cameras. Step-up or step-down adapters can enable a given filter size to be used on a lens with a smaller or larger diameter, respectively. However, step-down filter adapters may introduce substantial vignetting (since the filter may block light at the edges of the lens), whereas step-up adapters mean that your filter is much larger (and potentially more cumbersome) than is required The height of the filter edges may also be important. Ultra-thin and other special filters are designed so that they can be used on wide angle lenses without vignetting. On the other hand, these may also be much more expensive and often do not have threads on the outside to accept another filter (or sometimes even the lens cap) How do you attach a filter to a lens? The majority of filters mount directly in front of a lens using a screw mount. The size of that mount varies according to the size of the lens and the manufacturer of that lens. A lens with a 50mm focal length by Olympus may require a 49mm size filter, a comparable Nikon lens might require a 52mm filter, and a similar Canon lens might require a 55mm filter Filter sizes for particular lenses are usually included in the lens' documentation and may also be found in many of our lens descriptions Photographers often place a clear filter (i.e. UV or Skylight) on each lens that they own because the filter helps protect the lens from dust and other particles Problems with Lens Filters: Filters should only be used when necessary because they can also adversely affect the image. Since they effectively introduce an additional piece of glass between your camera's sensor and the subject, they have the potential to reduce image quality. This usually comes in the form of either a slight color tint, a reduction in local or overall image contrast, or ghosting and increased lens flare caused by light inadvertently reflecting off the inside of the filter Filters may also introduce physical vignetting (light fall-off or blackening at the edges of the image) if their opaque edge gets in the way of light entering the lens (right example). This was created by stacking a polarizing filter on top of a UV filter while also using a wide angle lens-causing the edges of the outermost filter to get in the way of the image. Stacking filters therefore has the potential to make all of the above problems much worse Notes on Choosing a Filter Size for A Camera Lens: Lens filters generally come in two varieties: screw-on and front filters. Front filters are more flexible because they can be used on virtually any lens diameter, however these may also be more cumbersome to use since they may need to be held in front of the lens. On the other hand, filter holder kits are available that can improve this process. Screw-on filters can provide an air-tight seal when needed for protection, and cannot accidentally move relative to the lens during composure. The main disadvantage is that a given screw-on filter will only work with a specific lens size The size of a screw-on filter is expressed in terms of its diameter, which corresponds to the diameter usually listed on the top or front of your camera lens. This diameter is listed in millimeters and usually ranges from about 46 to 82 mm for digital SLR cameras. Step-up or step-down adapters can enable a given filter size to be used on a lens with a smaller or larger diameter, respectively. However, step-down filter adapters may introduce substantial vignetting (since the filter may block light at the edges of the lens), whereas step-up adapters mean that your filter is much larger (and potentially more cumbersome) than is required The height of the filter edges may also be important. Ultra-thin and other special filters are designed so that they can be used on wide angle lenses without vignetting. On the other hand, these may also be much more expensive and often do not have threads on the outside to accept another filter (or sometimes even the lens cap) Package Included: 1 x 55mm High Definition Ultraviolet UV Filter

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