Durable Outdoor Work Solar Energy Fan Motorcycle Safety Helmet

Durable Outdoor Work Solar Energy Fan Motorcycle Safety Helmet

5 (8 product reviews)Added 4 years ago
US$ 28.99 Free worldwide shipping!
DinoDirect
Thanks for visiting! No one likes wearing bulky, claustrophobic helmets, so this special Motorcycle Safety Helmet is a great idea, plus it looks awesome too. Here your dream will come true.This Solar Energy Fan Helmet takes the solar energy as its power, environmental and safe. Keep cool with this solar power fan cooling cap in the hot day. You do not need to worry about any environmental pollution and destruction. This Outdoor Safety Helmet is superior ventilation, wonderful shape and amazing fit. This convenient Outdoor Safety Helmet keeps you safe and is easy to stow away in your backpack. The convenient, ergonomic Outdoor Safety Helmet also features headgear designed to suit different weather conditions via detachable rain and sun covers. So what are you still waiting for? ## Product Description Specification Buying Guide Return Policies Specifications: This is a Durable Outdoor Work Fan Motorcycle Safety Solar Helmet This Motorcycle Safety Helmettakes the solar energy as its power, environmental and safe You do not need to worry about any environmental pollution and destruction Keep cool and safe with this Solar Energy Fan Helmet in the hot day This Outdoor Safety Helmet is great for outdoor work when you want to cool down Material: PE Size: 29 x 23 x 17cm/11.42 x 9.06 x 6.69in(L x W x H) Fan Diameter: 6.5cm/2.56in Solar Panel Diameter: 6.8cm/2.68in Details: Great for outdoor work when you want to cool down ThisSolar Energy Fan Helmet takes the solar energy as its power, environmental and safe. Keep cool with this solar power fan cooling cap in the hot day You do not need to worry about any environmental pollution and destruction. ThisOutdoor Safety Helmet is superior ventilation, wonderful shape and amazing fit This convenientOutdoor Safety Helmetkeeps you safe and is easy to stow away in your backpack The convenient, ergonomic Outdoor Safety Helmet also features headgear designed to suit different weather conditions via detachable rain and sun covers How to Clean a Helmet: Your bicycle helmet is one of your best friends when you're riding, but it's not a pleasant object if it's gotten dirty and smelly. Here's some tips for getting it cleaned up spic and span. Washing a bicycle helmet is best done by hand. Using a dishwasher, washing machine, or the like will very likely damage or weaken the helmet. Start by filling a basin with warm water and a mild soap solution. Dunk the helmet and with a soft cloth or brush scrub away any dirt. Be sure to pay careful attention to padding and fabric like straps, etc. After you've washed the helmet, rinse thoroughly with clear water. Blot dry with a clean towel. Sit your helmet in a warm spot and allow it to dry. Never use solvents or cleaning solutions on the helmet. These may damage the helmet or harm your skin. History of Designs: A cycle helmet should be light in weight and should provide adequate ventilation, because cycling can be an intense aerobic activity which significantly raises body temperature, and the head in particular needs to be able to regulate its temperature. The dominant form of helmet up to the 1970s was the leather "hairnet" style, mainly used by racing cyclists. This offered minimal impact protection and acceptable protection from scrapes and cuts. In countries with long traditions of utility cycling, very few cyclists wear helmets. The use of helmets by non-racing cyclists began in the U.S. in the 1970s. After many decades when bicycles were regarded as children's toys only, many American adults took up cycling during and after the bike boom of the 1970s. Two of the first modern bicycle helmets were made by MSR, a manufacturer of mountaineering equipment, and Bell Sports, a manufacturer of helmets for auto racing and motorcycles. These helmets were a spinoff from the development of expanded polystyrene foam liners for motorcycling and motorsport helmets, and had hard polycarbonate plastic shells. The bicycle helmet arm of Bell was split off in 1991 as Bell Sports Inc., having completely overtaken the motorcycle and motor sports helmet business. The first commercially successful purpose-designed bicycle helmet was the Bell Biker, a polystyrene-lined hard shell released in 1975. At the time there was no appropriate standard; the only applicable one, from Snell, would be passed only by a light open-face motorcycle helmet. Over time the design was refined and by 1983 Bell were making the V1-Pro, the first polystyrene helmet intended for racing use. In 1984 Bell produced the Li'l Bell Shell, a no-shell children's helmet. These early helmets had little ventilation. In 1985, Snell B85 was introduced, the first widely adopted standard for bicycle helmets; this has subsequently been refined into B90 and B95 (see Standards below). At this time helmets were almost all either hard-shell or no-shell (perhaps with a vacuum-formed plastic cover). Ventilation was still minimal due mainly to technical limitations of the foams and shells in use. A Giro Atmos helmet, showing seamless in-mould microshell construction.Around 1990 a new construction technique was invented: in-mould microshell. A very thin shell was incorporated during the moulding process. This rapidly became the dominant technology, allowing for larger vents and more complex shapes than hard shells. Hard shells declined rapidly among the general cyclist population during the 1990s, almost disappearing by the end of the decade, but remain popular with BMX riders as well as inline skaters and skateboarders. The late 1990s and early 2000s saw advances in retention and fitting systems, replacing the old system of varying thickness pads with cradles which adjust quite precisely to the rider's head. This has also resulted in the back of the head being less covered by the helmet; impacts to this region are rare, but it does make a modern bike helmet much less suitable for activities such as unicycling, skateboarding and inline skating, where falling over backward is relatively common. Other helmets will be more suitable for these activities. Since more advanced helmets began being used in the Tour de France, carbon fiber inserts have started to be used to increase strength and protection of the helmet. The Giro Atmos and Ionos, as well as the Bell Alchera are among the first to use carbon fiber. Some modern racing bicycle helmets have a long tapering back end for streamlining. This type of helmet is mainly dedicated to Time Trial racing as they lack significant ventilation, making them uncomfortable for long races. Fit and Care: It is important that a helmet should fit the cyclist properly - in one study of children and adolescents aged 4 to 18 years, 96% were found to be incorrectly fitted. Efficacy of incorrectly fitted helmets is reckoned to be much lower; one estimate states that risk is increased almost twofold. Most manufacturers provide a range of sizes ranging from children's to adult with additional variations from small to medium to large. The correct size is important. Some adjustment can usually be made using different thickness foam pads. Helmets are held on the head with nylon straps, which must be adjusted to fit the individual. This can be difficult to achieve, depending on the design. Most helmets will have multiple adjustment points on the strap to allow both strap and helmet to be correctly positioned. Additionally, some helmets have adjustable cradles which fit the helmet to the occipital region of the skull. These provide no protection, only fit, so helmets with this type of adjustment are unsuitable for roller skating, stunts, skateboarding and unicycling. In general, the more skull coverage a helmet provides, the more effectively it can be fitted to the head and hence the better it will remain on the head in an accident. The helmet should sit level on the cyclist's head with only a couple of finger-widths between eyebrow and the helmet brim. The strap should sit at the back of the lower jaw, against the throat, and be sufficiently tight that the helmet does not move on the head. It should not be possible to insert more than one finger's thickness between the strap and the throat. Newer helmets for toddlers and children feature flat backs that prevent the helmet from tilting too far forward when worn while riding in a trailer or child seat with a headrest. The Snell Memorial Foundation recommends that any helmet that has sustained a substantial blow should be discarded and replaced, including any helmet involved in a crash in which the head has hit a hard surface or in which a fall has resulted in marks on the shell. Because some helmet materials deteriorate with age (in particular sunlight exposure), the Snell Memorial Foundation recommends that a helmet be replaced at least every 5 years, or sooner if the manufacturer recommends it. Package Included: * 1 x Durable Outdoor Work Solar Energy Fan Motorcycle Safety Helmet

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